BADIL Staff

The campaign for boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) against Israel was borne of the belief that human rights and international law – in conjunction with the United Nations Charter and General Assembly resolutions - provide the only viable road map for a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East. In the 7 years that have since passed, the need for such an approach has only become more apparent, and this campaign should be maintained until such a time that the State of Israel complies in full with its obligations as laid out under international law.

By 1920, the League of Nations had affirmed the applicability of the right to self-determination to the people of Palestine and decided to establish a temporary Mandatory system to facilitate Palestine's independence in accordance with Article 22 of its Covenant. Article 22 stated that “[c]ertain communities formerly belonging to the Turkish empire have reached a stage of development where their existence as independent nations can be provisionally recognized subject to the rendering of administrative advice and assistance by a Mandatory until such time as they are able to stand alone. The wishes of these communities must be a principal consideration in the selection of the Mandatory.”

IGLYO moves out of Israel!
29th July 2011 - Palestinian queer groups welcome the decision by the board of IGLYO to withdraw their annual General Assembly conference from Tel Aviv, Israel. Since June 1st, a campaign to get 'IGLYO Out of Israel' was launched by Palestinian Queer Groups to protest the organization’s decision to hold its General Assembly in Tel Aviv, and accept funding from the Israeli government, followed by a call to boycott the conference after IGLYO declined to change its location.

 

 By 1920, the League of Nations had affirmed the applicability of the right to self-determination to the people of Palestine and decided to establish a temporary Mandatory system to facilitate Palestine's independence in accordance with Article 22 of its Covenant. Article 22 stated that “[c]ertain communities formerly belonging to the Turkish empire have reached a stage of development where their existence as independent nations can be provisionally recognized subject to the rendering of administrative advice and assistance by a Mandatory until such time as they are able to stand alone. The wishes of these communities must be a principal consideration in the selection of the Mandatory.”

Signatories to “Irish artists pledge to Boycott Israel” reaches 200
13th January 2011 – Irish singer-songwriter Dylan Walsh has become the landmark 200th signatory to the “Irish artists pledge to Boycott Israel”. The pledge, launched in August 2010, commits endorsers to not “avail of any invitation to perform or exhibit in Israel, nor to accept any funding from any institution linked to the government of Israel, until such time as Israel complies with international law and universal principles of human rights”. It has garnered the support of many high profile Irish creative and performing artists such as Stephen Rea, Sinéad Cusack, Christy Moore, Donal Lunny, Andy Irvine, Damien Dempsey, Neilí Conroy, Conor Kostick, Liam Ó Maonlaí, Sharon Shannon, Robert Ballagh and Nuala Dhomhnaill.

A report from the BADIL-Zochrot joint actions

As the May 15th marches reaffirmed the refugees at the center of the Palestinian struggle and revealed new avenues for the realization of their rights, questions related to practical aspects of refugee return are becoming of increasing significance. Over the past two years, BADIL and Zochrot have been involved in an innovative project to study the practical aspects of refugee return. The project builds on the deep respect in international law for the right of return,1 and its widespread affirmation as the only acceptable durable solution, and starts to address how refugees will return to properties and homes from which they were forcibly displaced, and how such a return can be implemented in a practical, fair, and efficient manner that protects the legitimate interests of all stakeholders involved.

The revolutionary spirit of the Arab Spring manifested itself in the actions of Palestinians, Arabs, and their allies on this Nakba Day 2011. Alongside the usual annual gatherings marking the Palestinian Nakba of 1948, Palestinian, Syrian, Egyptian, Jordanian and Lebanese activists made unprecedented strides in their quest to claim the right of return for refugees to their places of origin inside historic Palestine and the occupied Golan Heights.1

Glasgow shops join boycott of all Israeli produce
30 August 2010 – Following a campaign by Friends of Al Aqsa and the Scottish Palestine Solidarity Campaign, Asian shops in a key area of Glasgow declare themselves free of Israeli produce. A number of shopkeepers were unaware that they were even stocking Israeli goods and thanked campaigners for helping them to correctly identify Israeli goods.

In 1994, after the signing of the Oslo Accords between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel, the Qadhafi government in Libya sought to show its objection to the agreements by expelling the Palestinian community residing in the country. One of the Palestinians living in Libya at the time was Professor Bassem Sirhan, we spoke to him about the Libyan policy of expulsion and the injustice that befell the Palestinian community.

Impunity continues to prevail in the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT), a state of affairs clearly evident in the international response to Israel’s military offensive in the occupied Gaza Strip between 27 December 2008 – 18 January 2009 in which more than  1,400 Palestinians and 14 Israelis were killed.[1]  83% of the Palestinian victims were Geneva-Convention protected civilians, most of them Palestinian refugees who had been forcibly displaced from their homes and properties to the Gaza Strip as a result of Israel's ethnic cleansing operation (the Nakba) of 1948.