BADIL

  • increase font size
  • Default font size
  • decrease font size
Home al-Majdal Hazem Jamjoum
Hazem Jamjoum

Hazem Jamjoum

*Hazem Jamjoum is a graduate student in Arab and Middle Eastern Studies at the American University of Beirut and the editor in chief of al-Majdal.

Interview with Anis F. Kassim

HJ: What legal status was afforded Palestinians who came under Jordanian control after the 1948 Nakba?
 
AK: On 19 May 1948, the Jordanian army entered the area of central Palestine that the Zionist forces were unable to occupy, and began the process of legally incorporating central Palestine into the Jordanian Kingdom. As part of this process, on 20 December 1949, the Jordanian Council of Ministries amended the 1928 Citizenship Law such that all Palestinians who took refuge in Jordan or who remained in the western areas controlled by Jordan at the time of the law’s entry into force, became full Jordanian citizens for all legal purposes. The law did not discriminate between Palestinian refugees displaced from the areas that Israel occupied in 1948 and those of the area that the Jordanian authorities renamed the “West Bank” in 1950.

Miércoles 16 de Mayo de 2012 11:13

Symbols of Nakba, Visions of Return

For peoples engaged in struggle, the potency of symbolism is undeniable. In the Palestinian case, the symbols of struggle cover the world throughout which we have been dispersed, and exhibit the depth of a century-old quest for freedom. Among the most potent of these symbols is the kufiyyeh, a headdress associated with 1936-1939 worker and peasant uprising against British occupation and Zionist colonization. Many images are also symbols, like the iconic photographs of the expulsions of 1948 and the first tents of the refugee camps, and those of martyrs and freedom fighters. There are also the keys. Refugees carried these keys to the homes lodged in their memories to which they were sure they would return; logos of the leading militant factions; a caricature character with the spiky hair of a hedgehog witnessing the bitter ironies of loss and victory; the map of a homeland resembling a sharp shard of glass carved out by European powers and gifted to the world’s most famous Diaspora, only to create today’s largest and longest standing refugee population; and a flag designed as part of a British colonial campaign against its rival Ottoman empire, later to become a banned symbol of resistance raised in acts of defiance by protesting youth throughout the 1980s.

Today a certain disconnect, a rupture, has emerged constituting a discomforting space between the symbol and what it symbolizes. The locks into which refugees’ keys fit are now buried—together with the doors and the houses they guarded—under bustling cities and Jewish National Fund parks and picnic areas. The weapons adorning some of the leading factions’ logos are today used to police the mothers and cousins of their bearers. The Palestinian flag now adorns the mahogany desks and buildings of an Authority seeking to talk its way to whatever scraps of land and sovereignty the colonial power will allow to fall from the negotiating table. The map of Palestine bears the name of the colonizer’s regime on most maps produced today, and a more accurate map of the “State of Palestine,” if such a scrap is to somehow fall from the table, looks more like ghettoes in the form of a splatter of blood than a bandage to a century of wounds. How long will it be before settlers produce Handhala T-shirts in the Jews-only settler-colonies to sell to Palestinian refugees in neighboring countries and Westerners seeking to replace their tattered Che Guevara paraphernalia with something fresh?

On May 15, 2011, and for the first time since their expulsion in 1948, tens of thousands of Palestinians in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and the occupied West Bank and Gaza marched toward the borders of the part of Palestine occupied by Zionist forces in 1948. Logistical organizers of each of these return marches had planned for symbolic actions in which participants were to stand near the borders, listen to flowery speeches about the right of return and the sanctity of the homeland, and then get back on their buses and return to their refugee camp residences. Many of these organizers remained near the platforms erected for the speeches, congratulated themselves on an impressive turnout, and delivered their speeches to empty chairs.

Interview with Anis F. Kassim by Hazem Jamjoum
 
HJ: What legal status was afforded Palestinians who came under Jordanian control after the 1948 Nakba?
 
AK: On 19 May 1948, the Jordanian army entered the area of central Palestine that the Zionist forces were unable to occupy, and began the process of legally incorporating central Palestine into the Jordanian Kingdom. As part of this process, on 20 December 1949, the Jordanian Council of Ministries amended the 1928 Citizenship Law such that all Palestinians who took refuge in Jordan or who remained in the western areas controlled by Jordan at the time of the law’s entry into force, became full Jordanian citizens for all legal purposes. The law did not discriminate between Palestinian refugees displaced from the areas that Israel occupied in 1948 and those of the area that the Jordanian authorities renamed the “West Bank” in 1950.

BADIL proudly announced the winners of the 2010 Al-Awda Award at the Fourth Annual Awda Awards Ceremony. The award aims to foster Palestinian talent and creativity and to raise the profile of the Palestinian Nakba and the right of all forcibly displaced Palestinians to return to their homes and lands As with previous years, the Awda Award Festival launched the Nakba commemoration activities in Palestine that continued over the subsequent months.

Award recipients received their prizes on Wednesday 5 May 2010 in two Awda Award Festivals: one held at the Ramallah Cultural Palace (West Bank), and another in the hall of Popular Committee for Community Services- El Nusayrat Refugee Camp in the Gaza Strip. The categories of the 2010 Al-Awda Award included: Best Nakba Commemoration Poster, Best Research Paper, Best Written Journalism Article, Best Caricature, and Best Photograph (photographer under 18).

Prizes were granted by the representative of the jury for each category. The Palestinian artist Sulaiman Mansour presented the awards for the Best Commemoration Nakba Poster, Artist Mohammad Sabaaneh presented the award for Best Caricature, Artist Alaa Badarneh presented the awards for Best Photograph, Journalist Najib Faraj presented the awards for Best Written Journalism Article, and attorney Shawqi Al-Issa presented the award for Best Research Paper.

At the Ramallah festival, an exhibition showcasing the best submissions in the caricature, poster and photography categories was held before the festival. The festival was first opened with the Palestinian national anthem, followed by Badil’s opening speech given by Tayseer Nasrallah. A highlight of this year's festival was the presence of two celebrity guests via satellite from Lebanon: celebrated singer Ahmad Kaabour and renowned poet Zahi Wahbi performed to the packed audience. After prizes were handed to the winning participants, the night came to a close with the beautiful folkloric Palestinian dance presented by the Wishah Troupe for Popular Dance, who were able to fill the stage with movement, color, and enthusiasm.

This year's Awda Award participants hailed from across the globe. While most submissions came from various parts of Palestine, many submissions were sent in from Palestinian refugees in exile, as well as from artists, writers and researchers from all over the world.

The jury members for each category were composed of internationally renowned Palestinian artists, academics, poets, and authors. Members of the different juries described this year’s competition as exceeding expectations in most categories, confirming that, in addition to being a platform for amateurs, the award has drawn the attention of established artists and intellectuals.

Jueves 29 de Abril de 2010 13:17

Photo-story: A Trip to al-Qabu

On a trip to find the Palestinian village of al-Qabu, destroyed and depopulated by Israeli military forces in October 1948, one encounters the ways in which the Jewish National Fund's parks and forests have altered the Palestinian landscape. The following photographs give a small sense of how this is done.

 

بقلم: حازم جمجوم*

تنفيذا لأوامر الحكومة؛ دخلت قوات إسرائيلية، يرافقها عمال هدم وجرافتان إلى القرية في الساعة التاسعة والنصف من صباح يوم الثامن من أيار 2007، وفي وقت كان 2فيه جميع رجال القرية في أعمالهم، ثم قامت هذه القوات بتدمير كل هيكل تقع عليه العين. وقد أجبرت النساء، والأطفال، والشيوخ الموجودين في القرية على الخروج من البيوت الثلاثين قبل تدميرها جميعا، تاركين أكثر من مائة فلسطيني بلا مأوى تحت أشعة شمس الصيف الحارقة.(1)

 لم تجر هذه الواقعة في الضفة الغربية أو قطاع غزة؛ بل جرت في قرية "طويل أبو جروال" في النقب، وجميع الفلسطينيين الذين تم تهجيرهم قسريا هم من مواطني "دولة إسرائيل".منذ عام 2006، تعرض سكان قرية "طويل أبو جروال" لعمليات هدم المنازل أكثر من خمسة عشر مرة. وفي معظم هذه المرات جرى تدمير القرية بأكملها تماما. (2)وهذه القرية ليست الاستثناء، بل القاعدة في النقب، فقد حاولت إسرائيل بشكل منهجي حشر البدو الفلسطينيين في جنوب البلاد في بقع صغيرة من الأرض، بينما تقوم بالسيطرة على ما يتبقى من هذا النصف المنسي لفلسطين.

We demand that the Right of Return be fulfilled. Until then, Palestinian refugees in the diaspora and internally displaced Palestinians need to be granted full economic, political and social rights.

From the Beirut Declaration 19 September 2004

Since declaring its bloody ‘war on terror’, the United States has not only changed its own immigration policies and procedures, but Canada’s as well. Canada’s new Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (2002) initiated an all out war on immigrants and refugees in this country. The main victims of this war have been poor people, specifically those from Arab and Muslim countries.

Miércoles 26 de Agosto de 2009 15:56

We Loved the Land and the Land Loved Us

Mohammad Manasra - Växjö, Sweden

“The Palestinian peasant is an educated peasant.” Mohammad’s father’s words accompany the constant ringing in his ears that started when he was injured by a car bomb meant to kill him on the streets of Baghdad. “We were farmers, we knew the land, we loved the land and the land loved us.” It was this love of the land that led the villagers of ‘Ayn Ghazal, on the slopes of Mount Carmel to fiercely resist the Zionist onslaught in 1948. Despite the signinficant imbalance in the level of training and armament that clearly favored the Zaionist forces fighting to clear the area of its indigenous inhabitants, the defenders of ‘Ayn Ghazal, Ijzim and Jaba’ relentlessly fought to keep their families alive and on their land. “The Zionists called our three villages the ‘dirty triangle’ because they couldn’t defeat us, even though they were heavily armed with modern guns and artillery and planes while every three of the Palestinian resistance fighters had to share a rifle!”

Miércoles 26 de Agosto de 2009 15:40

We are the Children of the Apostles

Reverend Lilian Mattar-Patey – La Salle, Canada

While she was only two years old when her family was forced to flee their West Jerusalem home, Reverend Mattar was told the story so often that it is deeply entrenched as part of her own memory. Her father, Suleiman Hanna Mattar, was a successful banker with Barclays bank in Haifa, and the bank had moved him to Jerusalem. In the weeks before the Zionist attack on Jerusalem, her sister's closest Jewish friends had told her that there was going to be trouble for Arabs, her father had also been told that if they did not leave their home they would all be killed. So it was obvious when the sounds and tremors of explosions began to fill the house that they needed to leave.

JPAGE_CURRENT_OF_TOTAL

Al-Majdal Autores